Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

REVIEW

One of the many classics, and the first book written by Jane Austen, has deep and meaningful undertones. The title itself tells so much about the story to follow.

Elinor is the eldest of three sisters and by far the most sensible. She keeps her emotions private and always presents herself in the correct manner. She is in direct contrast to her younger sister, Marianne, who believes that emotions should be shown and not hidden away. Both girls feel the bitter taste of heartbreak but deal with it in completely different ways, Elinor hides her pain behind a closed-off mask, whereas Marianne is open and direct about her feelings.

The story is beautifully written and although the language used may seem old (it is over a hundred years old!) it is easy to follow and adds to the character of the story. The way that Austen describes the countryside, the cottage, the park etc. had me drawn into the world of the Dashwood’s and living in that time with horses, carriages, 2/3 day journeys to ‘town’ (London) and days spent reading or drawing.

The male characters in the book are as diverse as the female. On the one hand is Edward Ferrars, quiet and unassuming, and on the other is John Willoughby, ostentatious and forthright. My feelings are definitely mixed for Willoughby. He is believed to be a man of little integrity and the cause of much heartache to poor Marianne, and to some extent he is, but towards the end of the story, during a heart-to-heart with Elinor, my feelings for him did change. I am still far happier with the outcome for both the girls and believe that they would have lead much happier and enjoyable lives with the men they finally found love with.

Lovely story of love and heartbreak.

Synopsis

Marianne Dashwood wears her heart on her sleeve, and when she falls in love with the dashing but unsuitable John Willoughby she ignores her sister Elinor’s warning that her impulsive behaviour leaves her open to gossip and innuendo. Meanwhile Elinor, always sensitive to social convention, is struggling to conceal her own romantic disappointment, even from those closest to her. Through their parallel experience of love—and its threatened loss—the sisters learn that sense must mix with sensibility if they are to find personal happiness in a society where status and money govern the rules of love.

(https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/14935.Sense_and_Sensibility)

Author: mandy

I love to Read! Mostly romance (of all types) but I also enjoy murder mysteries, paranormal fantasy, sci-fi, comedy, pretty much anything.

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